Chapel Hill Reporting, LLC SM
Certified Stenotype Machine Court Reporters
Certified Legal Videographers

FAQS

FAQ: How does stenograph reporting work?
Reporters graduate with minimum speed capacity of 225 words per minute. We use a computerized stenography machine in combination with a specialized form of shorthand to write whole words and phrases with one “stroke” as opposed to typing individual letters to spell out words. Reporters start out by learning the shorthand theory, which includes a multitude of brief forms, and then it’s a matter employing the “practice makes perfect” theory.  See article at WSJ.com.


FAQ: Why do we confirm depositions the day before the deposition?
If you schedule a deposition with Chapel Hill Reporting, you will always receive a confirmation call the business day before the deposition is to take place. If you have not received that call by early afternoon, it means we do not have the assignment on our calendar. We encourage a phone call (919) 969-1169 over an email for last-minute scheduling.

FAQ: What if I have an emergency?
Call (919) 969-1169 and send an email.  We monitor both phone and email after hours.

FAQ: What is the meaning of court reporter designations?
Registered Professional Reporter (RPR)
Written knowledge and skills test given by the National Court Reporters Association. The skills portion consists of 5 minutes of literary material dictated at 180 words per minute (wpm), jury charge dictated at 200 wpm, and testimony/Q&A dictated at 225 wpm (grading based on the accuracy of the transcripts produced).

Certified Realtime Reporter (CRR)
Skills Test. Must hold an RPR as a prerequisite to this certification given by the National Court Reporters Association. The test consists of 5 minutes of straight material ranging in speed from 180 to 200 words per minute. The test is graded based on the raw realtime output.

Registered Merit Reporter (RMR)
Skills test given by the National Court Reporters Association. The skills portion consists of 5 minutes of literary material dictated at 200 words per minute (wpm), jury charge dictated at 240 wpm, and testimony dictated at 260 wpm (grading based on the accuracy of the transcripts produced). The reporter must hold an RPR to be eligible to take this examination.

Certified LiveNote Reporter (CLR)
The Certified LiveNote Reporter (CLR) certification program advances the role of technology in court reporting. In addition to learning about the technical aspects of realtime, reporters receive guidance and hands-on experience with software, hardware and the tools necessary to provide a quality realtime experience for their clients.

Certified Legal Video Specialist (CLVS)
Training followed by written and production knowledge and skills test given by the National Court Reporters Association. Trains videographers to videotape depositions and court room proceedings in accordance with accepted Rules of Civil Procedure.  The videographer must pass the knowledge test and a staged deposition demonstrating  ability to follow videotape deposition guidelines and produce a usable, high-quality videotape of the deposition.